Book Review: The Last of the Greenwoods by Clare Morrall

greenwoodsWho wouldn’t want to live in an English rural backwater where there’s a little branch railway-line long since mothballed just asking to be restored? You could join a small society of passionate enthusiasts and dedicate all your spare time to finding engines and carriages, refurbishing and reupholstering and essentially going back in time.

In The Last of the Greenwoods, Zohra Dasgupta is a young postal worker, whose best friend Crispin has roped her into a group of railway restoration buffs. She’s only 25 and lives with her parents over their corner shop so seems an unlikely candidate for a pastime you’d imagine to be enjoyed largely by male retirees. The railway runs through Crispin’s father’s land, what there is left of it, formerly an estate of some standing. Crispin lives here with his father in a crumbling ruin of a once splendid mansion, camping out in a still liveable corner. Continue reading “Book Review: The Last of the Greenwoods by Clare Morrall”

Quick Review: The Man I Think I Know by Mike Gayle

The Man.jpgHere’s a lovely read about that rare thing in fiction – male friendship.

James de Witt and Danny Allen both went to the same boarding school and as top scholars, both were expected to make a mark on the world. Danny, a scholarship boy, even won the school’s academic prize, but while he’s a university student, a tragedy occurs for which he feels to blame and his life unravels. We meet him years later as a layabout and recovering alcoholic, on his last chance with the Job Centre, and likely to lose his flat.

Danny takes work as a carer at a residential  home. He’s quite good at this because he is so apathetic, he isn’t bothered about cleaning up people’s messes and having things thrown at him. Continue reading “Quick Review: The Man I Think I Know by Mike Gayle”

Up Lit – Is it Anything New?

Up Lit could be the latest literary genre. The term was coined in a recent Guardian article in response to the success of novels such as Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman and The Trouble with Goats and Sheep by Joanna Cannon. (Incidentally, these two books made my top ten reads for 2017.) You might say this is a genre with empathy at its core, a welcome break from the psychological thrillers that have been claiming top spots on the best-seller lists – books like Gone Girl (Gillian Flynn) and Girl on a Train (Paula Hawkins). Continue reading “Up Lit – Is it Anything New?”